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The Sidhe (The Glittering Throng) - Gothic Witchcraft

About The Sidhe (The Glittering Throng)

Previous Entry The Sidhe (The Glittering Throng) May. 25th, 2004 @ 12:52 pm Next Entry
The Sidhe (The Glittering Throng)

Image: Mischievous, puckish, wild, and untamed. Somewhat unkempt appearance as if they had been playing out in the woods and tumbled down a hill.

Power: Glamour, Hidden Nature, Ecstasy

Symbology: Sensual imagery, physical abandon to the true, wild nature of the Self. Unleashing the inner person to run free.

Examples:

Stolen Child by Yeats

Comments:
The Stolen Child - Yeats
WHERE dips the rocky highland
Of Sleuth Wood in the lake,
There lies a leafy island
Where flapping herons wake
The drowsy water-rats;
There we've hid our faery vats,
Full of berries
And of reddest stolen cherries.
Come away, O human child!
To the waters and the wild
With a faery, hand in hand,
For the world's more full of weeping than you
can understand.

Where the wave of moonlight glosses
The dim grey sands with light,
Far off by furthest Rosses
We foot it all the night,
Weaving olden dances,
Mingling hands and mingling glances
Till the moon has taken flight;
To and fro we leap
And chase the frothy bubbles,
While the world is full of troubles
And is anxious in its sleep.
Come away, O human child!
To the waters and the wild
With a faery, hand in hand,
For the world's more full of weeping than you can understand.

Where the wandering water gushes
From the hills above Glen-Car,.
In pools among the rushes
That scarce could bathe a star,
We seek for slumbering trout
And whispering in their ears
Give them unquiet dreams;
Leaning softly out
From ferns that drop their tears
Over the young streams.
Come away, O human child!
To to waters and the wild
With a faery, hand in hand,
For to world's more full of weeping than you can understand.

Away with us he's going,
The solemn-eyed:
He'll hear no more the lowing
Of the calves on the warm hillside
Or the kettle on the hob
Sing peace into his breast,
Or see the brown mice bob
Round and round the oatmeal-chest.
For be comes, the human child,
To the waters and the wild
With a faery, hand in hand,
from a world more full of weeping than you can understand.
Current Mood: artistic
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From:wickedwit
Date:June 3rd, 2004 05:35 pm (UTC)

Artwork

(Link)
I don't have much for the sidhe, since I haven't had much time for searching recently between work and vacation. :)


Ferdinand Lured by Ariel by John Everett Millais

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From:blackthornglade
Date:June 3rd, 2004 05:55 pm (UTC)

Re: Artwork

(Link)
That makes two of us. :) thank you!

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From:wickedwit
Date:June 3rd, 2004 06:38 pm (UTC)

Re: Artwork

(Link)
;) I had some extra time this morning after I posted, so I, um... found more. Some are a little late to be called Victorian...


Fairy Lake by Rackham



Fairy Dance 1 by Rackham


The Fairies in Spring


Contradiction: Oberon and Titania by Richard Dadd



Fairy and Owls by Richard Doyle



Fairy Procession by Richard Doyle



Fairyland by Edward Reginald Frampton



Flora and the Zephyrs by John William Waterhouse



Puck by Dadd



The Fairy Feller's Master Stroke by Richard Dadd (The Queen song was named after it)



The Fairy Festival by Gustav Dore



From:anchasta
Date:June 11th, 2004 06:01 pm (UTC)

Re: Artwork

(Link)
Hee hee...the victorian image of Puck makes me double over with giggles!

Not exactly what I picture as the wild boy...lol

Sandman did a good job with the Puck, in my opinion. Not quite Victorian, but a little less flabby and harmless.
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